Parks, recreation, and culture

Granville Street Bridge

False Creek South destination walk

Route statistics

Distance 2.73 km
Steps 3,582
Elevation change 7 m

The False Creek South walking route takes you through a unique neighbourhood which has served as the benchmark for the redevelopment of False Creek. The area has a distinct and charming character, offering delightful views and fantastic recreation space. This walking route is 2.17 km or approximately 3,582 steps and travels along the seawall from the Cambie Street Bridge toward the Granville Street Bridge.

Route description

The False Creek South walking route takes you through a unique neighbourhood which has served as the benchmark for the redevelopment of False Creek. The area has a distinct and charming character, offering delightful views and fantastic recreation space. For many years the False Creek and Fairview Slopes neighbourhoods were covered by huge fir trees, and the Squamish Nation fished from the rugged shoreline. A shift came after 1887, when the CPR relocated its Pacific yards to the north side of the Creek. The forests were replaced by shipbuilding yards, sawmills, shingle mills, and various woodworking plants. 

Today, traveling along the  seawall to Granville Island you are sure to enjoy the amazing sights and witness the distinct character of this beautiful area. Take a walk through and feel a part of the lively pulse of a thriving community. 

Accessibility

This walk is wheelchair accessible. This portion of the seawall is a mix of shared and seperated paths for pedestrians and bicycle user. Surface materials include pavement, cobblestones, congomerated bricks and slate which can make traveling by wheels challenging at times.

Points of interest

Along the seawall

Along the seawall

Stamps Landing and Leg-in-Boot Square

The areas known as Stamps Landing and Leg-in-boot Square are commercial hubs with restaurants, studio space, and other private businesses mixed in. These small commerical areas serve as town squares for the residential buildings surrounding them. With a mixture of housing types this area was described as a “Greek mountain village with Belgian architecture in the heart of a North American town”.

The South False Creek Project, which was the vision of Alderman Walter Hardwick and bore the community you see today set a precedent for the creative redevelopment of industrial lands and for public access to the waterfront.

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Charleson Park

Charleson Park

Charleson park has a natural wilderness feeling and is the largest park in the Fairview neighbourhood at 7.14 hectares, nearly double the size of David Lam Park. This beautiful spot is alive with evergreens, weeping willows, and birch trees. It has plenty of area designated for dog off leash activities, as well as a soccer field, tennis courts, and playground. There is an enchanting waterfall and pond which is home to many ducks and larger birds such as herons. 

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Ron Basford and Sutcliffe Park

Ron Basford and Sutcliffe Park

Sutcliffe Park

At 2.88 hectares, this park offers ball hockey, basketball courts, tennis courts, and a skateboard park. It was named in the 1970s for Doug Sutcliffe who served as the City’s Project Manager for the development of the South False Creek project. Sutcliffe worked hard to ensure that the lower income areas of the project were as physically attractive as the higher income areas. He took on the project at a symbolic wage of one dollar per year, seeing the project to completion shortly before passing away.

Ron Basford Park

Named for Ron Basford, member of Parliament for Vancouver Centre 1963-1978. With his vision a decaying industrial site was transformed into an urban oasis and model community. He will always be remembered as Mr. Granville Island.

False Creek Community Centre

This recreation facility opened in 1980, and provides the public with a dance studio, fitness centre, gym, sauna, playground, pottery studio, and tennis courts. The centre also offers canoe and kayak lessons, day trips and special interest workshops.

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Granville Island

Granville Island

Momentum for the redevelopment of Granville Island built in 1972 when the National Harbours Board gave control of the land to the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation. The first phase of the redevelopment began with the opening of the Public Market in 1979, followed by the False Creek Community Centre, The Maritime Market, Emily Carr College of the Arts, theatres, studios, galleries and restaurants.

Granville Island successfully transformed from an industrial park to a thriving marketplace and entertainment destination. In 2004, it was named the "Best Neighbourhood in North America" by Project for Public Spaces, a New York-based nonprofit agency. This famous gathering spot draws about 10.5 million visitors each year. 

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