Queen Elizabeth Gardens

Queen Elizabeth garden desintation walk

Route statistics

Distance 0.41 km
Steps 538
Elevation change 4 m

Located in nearly the geographical center of Vancouver at the intersection of Cambie Street and West 33rd Avenue, Queen Elizabeth Park is one of the most delightful walking areas in the City. The park covers 130 Acres, but a simple walk around the garden is only 0.41 km, or 538 steps, and will take you to the “top of the City."

Route description

On average the park welcomes 6 million visitors annually, and with the many things to see and do it is no wonder that this location is such a popular destination. Main attractions include: the Bloedel Floral Conservatory; one of Canada’s best indoor arboretums, and the brilliant quarry gardens. The seasonally changing gardens proudly display expertly positioned, specifically selected ornamental trees and shrubs, and have earned the crowning title of, “Vancouver's horticultural jewel”. 

The park also offers the chance to try many sports including: tennis, basketball, pitch & putt, roller hockey, disc golf, and lawn bowling. The location also affords ample picnic area, a serene platform for tai chi, and excellent night time stargazing. 

Accessibility

The gardens are wheelchair accessible by following a marked path. Please note that some sections do have a significant incline.

Points of interest

Bloedel Conservatory

Bloedel Conservatory

Bloedel Conservatory is a domed lush paradise located in Queen Elizabeth Park atop the City of Vancouver’s highest point. More than 120 free-flying exotic birds, 500 exotic plants and flowers thrive within its temperature-controlled environment.

Constructed through a very generous donation from Prentice Bloedel, Bloedel was dedicated at its opening in 1969 “to a better appreciation and understanding of the world of plants."

Designated as a heritage building, it is jointly operated by Vancouver Park Board and the Vancouver Botanical Garden Association. Together, these partners also operate VanDusen Botanical Garden.

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Quarry and Rose gardens

Quarry and Rose gardens

Quarry garden

The main Quarry Garden is just west of the Bloedel Conservatory and offers a moment of high drama when first approached and viewed from the park's rim.

The once massive excavation is now home to specimen trees, shrubs, perennials, bulbs and annuals selected for their foliage, form and flower. A stream and cascading waterfall add cool comfort and variety to the artfully contrived landscape.

Located below and adjacent to Seasons in the Park restaurant is the smaller or North Quarry Garden. In contrast to the large quarry, this is a "dry" garden and has many oriental horticultural influences including an arching bridge over a stony streambed.

Rose garden

Located on the south-western perimeter of the park, the Rose Garden was built in 1967 to commemorate Canada’s Centennial. It contains many rose varieties including hardy hybrids such as the Parkland and Explorer series developed in Saskatchewan

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Love locks sculpture

Love locks sculpture

Love in the Rain

Artist: Bruce Voyce

A love locks sculpture dedicated to eternal love located in the lookout above the Quarry Garden in Queen Elizabeth Park.

The piece is designed by Vancouver artist Bruce Voyce and celebrates the shelter that love brings and the union that it forms. It will support several thousand locks on the skirts of each couple. Keys can be deposited in a box on site and will eventually be recycled or melted down to become part of another sculpture.

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Dancing Waters fountain

Dancing Waters fountain

The fabulous Dancing Waters fountain is located adjacent to Bloedel Conservatory and is attractive both day and night. It is comprised of 70 jets of water using 85,000 litres of recirculating water.

The fountain operates on a program to vary the heights of the jet and is an integral part of the Queen Elizabeth Plaza built on top of Vancouver’s principal drinking water reservoir.

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Knife Edge - Two Piece

Knife Edge - Two Piece

1 of 3 casts of this bronze scuplture, Henry Moore's Knife Edge Two Piece sits in the centre of the square outside the Bloedel Conservatory. It was installed in 1969 and was a gift to the Park Board by Prentice and Virginia Bloedel.

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