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City invests in non-profit sector to build community and organizational capacity, address poverty, and support innovative projects

Vancouver’s non-profit sector is an essential partner in helping to address the City’s priority to narrow the impacts that social status, racism, and other forms of exclusion have on the health of Vancouver residents.

Sandra Singh, General Manager of Arts, Culture, and Community Services

October 22 2019 –

Today, Vancouver City Council approved $842,500 in Social Policy grants to provide vital social services to people who need them, invest in physical spaces and facilities, help to expand access to childcare across the city, promote food security, and work towards an age-friendly city. The 33 approved grants will fund 26 different social non-profit organizations across the city.

“Vancouver’s non-profit sector is an essential partner in helping to address the City’s priority to narrow the impacts that social status, racism and other forms of exclusion have on the health of Vancouver residents,” said Sandra Singh, General Manager of Arts, Culture, and Community Services at City of Vancouver. “Non-profit organizations build collaboration, social connection and participation. Supporting a broad spectrum of non-profit organizations to provide key services also supports sustainability in the sector and helps us collectively achieve the shared vision of a healthy city for all.”

Some of the Council-approved projects

Organizational Capacity Building (Convening) Grant

Funding projects that bring together organizations and networks to advance skills, knowledge, tools, equipment and other resources in the non-profit sector.

  • Downtown Eastside Women's Centre Association ($30,000): The project brings together women-serving organizations operating in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside to improve the recruitment and retention of workers including creating and implementing workforce training and development opportunities among partner agencies.
  • Circle of Grandmothers, sponsored by Vancouver Aboriginal Community Policing Centre Society ($22,500): VACPC is hosting their project on behalf of the Circle of Grandmothers and other organizations in the Downtown East Side to network and build relations. The project responds to the impacts of racism and colonization and the residential school system and focuses on healing using a trauma-informed approach that incorporates Indigenous Ways and Wisdom from the diversity of Indigenous Cultures represented in the DTES of Vancouver.

Social Policy Capital Grant

Grants provide matching grant support for social infrastructure improvements that increase the capacity of facilities addressing conditions creating vulnerability for Vancouver residents.

  • Association of Neighbourhood Houses of BC doing business as Marpole Neighbourhood House ($15,000): Marpole Neighbourhood House is a new community space located in Marpole's old fire hall. As part of the tenant improvements to transform the fire hall into a space for community use, the proposed capital project will install a folding divider in the first-floor multipurpose room that will double programming space for seniors and community members with limited mobility who prefer ground-floor programming.

Childcare Research, Program Development and Innovation Grant

Support the non-capital costs of new and expanded childcare programs and research and innovation to improve policy and practice for Indigenous children who have been underserved.

  • B.C. Aboriginal Child Care Society ($35,000): The project offers collaboration, strategic development, and information sharing amongst organizations delivering Indigenous-led childcare programs.

Social Innovation Project Grant

Test new approaches to work toward an age-friendly city, including highlighting the resilience of seniors and low income seniors working together to improve access to transit and healthy food.

  • 411 Seniors Centre Society ($20,000): Produced by seniors for seniors, the podcast series will explore the “Age Friendly City,” bring to light the vitality and diversity of Vancouver’s seniors’ community, and challenge us to collectively rethink our views on aging and treatment of our elders.
  • BC Poverty Reduction Coalition ($28,400): In partnership with the Greater Vancouver food service hubs and their host facilities, this project will train community members to gather research and information to build a better understanding of how access to transit also impacts access to healthy food, find solutions and make recommendations to promote inclusion.

These Social Policy Grants help to advance work toward the city’s well-being, aligning with the Healthy City Strategy, the City’s social sustainability framework, and related initiatives including Reconciliation and the Women’s Equity Strategy.

Read the full list (240 KB) of Social Policy Grants for Neighbourhood and Non-Profit Capacity-Building, Food Security, and Social Innovation