Wade Comer, Waiting on a Friend, from the series Isolation, 2020

City launches Platforms: We Are Here, Live and invites Vancouver local artists to submit proposals for temporary public artworks

Artists offer responses to the conditions of our time and their works can help us engage and reconnect as we move through and beyond the pandemic.

Eric Fredericksen, head of Public Art at the City of Vancouver

April 12 2021 –

Building on the tremendous success of Platforms 2020, we're welcoming submissions for Platforms: We Are Here, Live, a public art program which will commission temporary artworks for existing platforms throughout Vancouver.

The program will focus on artists working in video and two-dimensional media. Each commissioned artist will receive $5,000 for the creation, editing, and design of the artwork.

We hope to feature up to twenty Vancouver-based and xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam), sḵwx̱wú7mesh (Squamish), and səlilwətaɬ (Tsleil-Waututh) artists, who are grappling with the issues revealed by the COVID-19 pandemic. Emerging artists and those new to working in the public realm are encouraged to apply. 

The Platforms program will run for one year, starting in November of 2021. Selected artworks will be displayed on platforms throughout the city, including the light box at šxʷƛ̓ exən Xwtl’a7shn Plaza, banners at Vancouver Public Library’s Central Branch, the glass wall at City Centre Canada Line Station, transit shelter posters, the VanLive! video screen and digital display boards throughout the city. 

Find information about submission guidelines

This program aligns with our key civic policy and strategic directions, such as Culture|Shift, the Reconciliation framework, and Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion initiatives.

Quotes

Eric Fredericksen, head of Public Art at the City of Vancouver

Platforms: We Are Here, Live highlights the crucial role of public art in our community by sharing the powerful works of local artists who continue to create from their living rooms and bedrooms and on the streets of the city at this critical moment,” said Eric Fredericksen, head of Public Art at the City of Vancouver. “Artists offer responses to the conditions of our time and their works can help us engage and reconnect as we move through and beyond the pandemic.”