Homeless senior

From care packages to podcasts: Grants awarded to organizations working on Vancouver’s homelessness crisis

These grants will support the recipients to deliver projects that will help in many ways, from raising awareness of the causes and solutions to homelessness to welcoming people who were previously unsheltered into new homes.

Celine Mauboules, Managing Director, Affordable Housing and Homelessness Services

June 10 2021 –

More than $65,000 is being awarded to 15 non-profit organizations who are working to challenge the stigma around homelessness and provide direct support to people experiencing homelessness.

The grants will support an array of initiatives as part of Metro Vancouver’s Homelessness Action Week, an annual campaign that takes place in mid-October with the aim of raising awareness about the causes and solutions to homelessness. 

“Homelessness is a humanitarian crisis that is taking place on our doorstep. Being without safe, stable accommodation limits people’s potential and creates severe suffering for those experiencing it, as well as producing additional tension within communities,” said Celine Mauboules, Managing Director, Affordable Housing and Homelessness Services. “These grants will support the recipients to deliver projects that will help in many ways, from raising awareness of the causes and solutions to homelessness to welcoming people who were previously unsheltered into new homes.”

Some of the organizations that have received grants from us this year

Mount Pleasant Neighbourhood House (MPNH): Destigmatizing Displacement: Breaking Down the Myths of Homelessness through Connection and Dialogue 

Focusing on destigmatization, MPNH will bring together community members to share their stories of colonization, displacement, and forced migration. They are aiming to break down myths and stereotypes associated with poverty, mental health, and homelessness; raise awareness about the systemic drivers of homelessness; and support intergenerational and intercultural relationship building.

Employ to Empower Foundation: Engaging Community Voices to Challenge Stigma of the DTES

Through an education and awareness-building podcast series, Employ to Empower Foundation aims to spark conversations, community dialogue, and engagement between people with experience of homelessness in the DTES and Vancouverites who may have limited awareness of the issues. “Employ to Empower will use the HAW grant to create experiential events and podcasts for entrepreneurs who face barriers in our Downtown Eastside (DTES) community,” said Christina Wong, Employ to Empower Foundation. “With these platforms, we want to create a safe space for entrepreneurs to share their story and sell their work in their own words. Getting the HAW grant is extremely important to us because the first step towards destigmatization of the DTES is cultivating awareness.”

South Vancouver Neighbourhood House:South Vancouver Community HUB For Homelessness

Funds will be used to increase community partnerships and develop a network of volunteers who will help people experiencing homelessness to navigate housing, income, and food resources. “The grant will strengthen and enable the existing hub to provide a consistent way to identify trends, issues, and needs within different pockets of South Vancouver,” said Mimi Rennie, South Vancouver Neighbourhood House. “The training for hub members, as well as community members, with different language capacities, will expand our capacity to provide outreach services to many diverse groups that live in South Vancouver.”

Review a full list of grant recipients (145 KB)

Funding source

Funding for HAW grants comes from the 2021 Arts, Culture and Community Services (ACCS) Street Homelessness Operating Budget, and the 2021 Capital Budget.

How we are supporting people experiencing homelessness: