Art on Unceded Land: Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Cultural Residency at Second Beach Studio

November 7 2018

“We are honored to have an artist of Chrystal Sparrow’s ability and lineage to inaugurate our A Frame activation at Second Beach,” said Park Board Chair Stuart Mackinnon.

Chrystal Sparrow

The Vancouver Park Board is honoured to announce that xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam) Coast Salish artist Chrystal Sparrow is the inaugural artist selected for the A Frame Activation: Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh (MST) Cultural Residency at Second Beach.

Chrystal Sparrow has a long family history of Coast Salish art and carving techniques. Her artistic practice has been passed down through three generations from her late grandfather Edward Sparrow Sr. who painted stories and myths, and her late father Irving Sparrow who was a Master Carver.

Sharing of creative practices

“We are honored to have an artist of Chrystal Sparrow’s ability and lineage to inaugurate our A Frame activation at Second Beach,” said Park Board Chair Stuart Mackinnon. “This cultural residency will provide tremendous opportunities for the sharing of creative practices and deep wisdom handed down by generations of Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh peoples on their unceded, traditional territories.”

Chrystal has a design style that is ‘feminine Coast Salish’, sharing her experiences as a young woman among male artists in her family. She works in many different media including painting, jewelry, leather and cedar weaving. Her work includes the design of a bronze medal for the HSBC Canada Sevens Rugby Tournament, the Salish Sea Waters panel that hangs in Vancouver City Hall and a Salish Beauty Cedar carving at UBC Thunderbird Arena, carved for the 2010 Olympics.

Studio open to public

The goal of this inaugural year-long Artist Residency is for a community member from the xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam), Sḵwx̱wú7mesh (Squamish), or sel̓íl̓witulh (Tsleil-Waututh) Nations to work in a creative, activated and community-engaged space in their unceded territory currently known as Stanley Park.

Chrystal aims to provide interactive educational and experiential opportunities for Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples. This artist in residence project offers Vancouver residents and visitors the opportunity to deepen their understanding of Reconciliation.

The A Frame Fieldhouse will serve as Chrystal’s studio for a year from July, 2018 to July 2019. She generously offers open studio and other learning opportunities for the public each Monday evening from 5:30 to 8:30 pm at the A-Frame building, 8701 Stanley Park Drive at Second Beach.

Check out her Facebook group for updates.

For more information on the cultural residency and Park Board reconciliation work, please contact pbreconciliation@vancouver.ca.