Cambie Corridor plan

Cambie Street Corridor

The opening of the Canada Line along Cambie Street was an opportunity for the City to create a sustainable neighbourhood - the Cambie Corridor.

The Corridor has easy access to transit, providing residents with a convenient alternative to driving. There are a number of large sites which will facilitate the development of low carbon district energy systems.

The Cambie Corridor Plan takes advantage of these critical building blocks of sustainability - integrating them with greater land use density and amenities - to build and enhance neighbourhoods along the Corridor.

The Cambie Corridor Plan is a land use policy which will guide future development along Cambie Street from 16th Avenue to the Fraser River between Heather and Manitoba Streets. The plan focuses on opportunities to integrate development with transit and to build and enhance the existing neighbourhoods along the Corridor while supporting the City's goals of environmental sustainability, liveability, and affordability.

The first two phases of the plan took two years to develop and involved extensive consultation with local residents, academics, subject experts, community leaders, urban planners, and city builders. Implementation - which is currently underway - includes a public realm plan, public benefits needs assessment, and district energy and utility servicing strategies.

As part of developing the Cambie Corridor plan, the City did extensive public involvement. Read about the public involvement in the details tab below.

Read about this project in-depth

Cambie Street corridor study area

Progress with this project

February 13, 2013 - Our online survey is now closed. Thanks to everyone who shared their thoughts. A summary of your feedback will be posted online shortly and shared with Council.

December 16 ,2012 - Take an online survey to give us your thoughts on the Cambie Corridor Public Realm Plan

The Public Realm Plan maps out directions for public space elements, such as plazas, parks, and trees. Review the display boards for the plan (below, or in the Documents tab), and then take our online survey to tell us what you think.

December 5, 2012 - Open house on Cambie Corridor public spaces

Drop by an open house to preview the draft Cambie Corridor Public Realm Plan which maps out directions for public space elements such as plazas and parks, water management systems, the heritage boulevard and street trees. Find out more about this emerging plan and tell us what you think.

Thursday, December 13, 4 - 8 pm
Oakridge Library Meeting Room
650 West 41st Avenue (at Cambie Street)

May 9, 2011 - Phase two approved

Council approved phase two of the Cambie Corridor plan. The Cambie Corridor plan includes policies for strategic sites along Cambie Street.

January 22, 2010 - Phase one completed

Council adopted phase one of the Cambie Corridor plan, which delivered a set of planning principles and an interim rezoning policy.

 

 

 

 

 

Current rezoning applications

The City is considering the approval of a number of rezoning applications in the Cambie Corridor area.

Policies

  • Cambie and Marine Drive Intersection current City policy

    Council reports

    On 9 May 2011, Council adopted the Cambie Corridor planning program Phase 2. Here are the reports, presentations, and minutes:

    On 22 January 2010, Council adopted the Cambie Corridor Planning Principles which led to the Cambie Corridor Plan. Here are the Council documents leading up to the decision:

    On 28 July 2009, Council approved Terms of Reference for the Cambie Corridor project. Here are the key Council documents:

    Public involvement

    Members of the public were given the opportunity to have their say on the phases of the Cambie Corridor project through a series of open houses, workshops and meetings.

    Here are the key documents from the open houses:

    Workshops

    On 13 December 2012, the City held a public realm open house. Here are the information boards for survey participants:

    In October 2009, the City held two workshops to get feedback on the draft principles. Here are the key documents from the workshops:

  • Project details

    The Cambie Corridor plan began in 2009. Here are the key developments of the project:

    Public involvement

    Members of the public were given the opportunity to have their say on the phases of the Cambie Corridor project through a series of open houses, workshops and meetings.

    Open houses

    For Phase One, a series of three open houses were held in September 2009. The open houses offered an opportunity for the public to learn about the principles of the plan and provide feedback as the process moved from Phase One to Phase Two.

    For Phase Two, a series of three open houses were held in November and December 2010. This second round of open houses further discussed the Cambie Corridor plan, giving community members the chance to give feedback on the character of the space, desired amenities, land use and public space opportunities.

    Workshops

    In October 2009, the City held two workshops to get feedback on the draft principles. Over 50 participants attended the workshops.

    Neighbourhood walkabout workshops

    In June, September and October 2010, the City planners met with residents in the King Edward, Oakridge/Langara and Marine Drive station areas. They walked through the neighbourhood and discussed concerns and ideas for future planning.

    The walkabouts were followed by a workshop to document and record the ideas, comments and suggestions.

    Consultation with senior high school students

    On 26 May and 1 June 2010, City planners met with senior students from Eric Hamber and Churchill Secondary Schools to discuss youth perspectives and ideas on the future uses of the Corridor.

    Youth engagement workshop

    On 25 October 2010 the City held a workshop at Churchill Secondary School to bring youth leaders together to talk about the public engagement elements along the Cambie Corridor.

    Leading up to the workshop, participants were given background information on the planning project and asked to explore the neighbourhood with a camera. Participants took photographs along the Cambie Corridor, exploring the streets, lanes and parks. The youth leaders then discussed their observations of the potential challenges and improvements at the workshop.

    Marine Drive workshop

    One 2 November 2010, residents near the Marine Drive station were invited to participate in a workshop to explore elements of urban design, public engagement, transportation and public benefits around the station.

    Marine Landing workshop

    On 17 January 2011, the City held a workshop to discuss plans for the Marine Landing area. Advocates for key sites around the Cambie Corridor presented their ideas for Marine Landing based on community feedback.

    To complete the Marine Landing area, the City's ongoing work will include a traffic study, a retail impact assessment and a public benefits strategy.

    Urban design panel workshops

    The City held urban design panel workshops on 16 June 2010 and 26 January 2011 to provide updates on the Cambie Corridor plan. These workshops presented the evolving plan for the Marine Landing precinct for review and comments.

    Core area group meetings

    The City held core area group meetings in March 2010, May 2010, November 2010 and finally in April 2011 with the King Edward, Oakridge/Langara and Marine Landing core area groups. The meetings gave regular updates on the Cambie Corridor plan, provided answers to any questions and identified the next steps.

    The opening of the Canada Line along Cambie Street and its connection to existing downtown rapid transit lines has given area residents a convenient alternative to driving.

    There are also a number of large sites along the Corridor that can be used to create low carbon district energy systems.

    The Cambie Corridor plan will take advantage of these two building blocks of sustainability – integrating them with greater land use density and amenities – to build and enhance neighourhoods along the Corridor.

    The Cambie Corridor plan introduces a new form of urbanism to Vancouver, with mostly mid-rise buildings, and taller buildings at key locations such as Marine Drive and Oakridge.

    Project vision

    The Cambie Corridor plan will give residents a variety of opportunities to live, work, shop and learn. The plan also reflects the City’s commitment to social diversity and addresses affordable housing issues.

    To accomplish these goals, the City will integrate a denser mix of housing and workspace with transit and cleaner energy sources. There will be a focus on key amenities, such as shopping, local gathering places, improved parks, community facilities, and civic spaces.

    Job space will be focused strategically in neighbourhood centres, existing shopping areas, and areas located close to transit stations.

    Guiding principles

    The seven guiding principals of the Cambie Corridor plan are to:

    • Provide land use that optimizes the investment in transit
    • Create a complete community
    • Create a walkable and cycleable corridor of neighbourhoods seamlessly linked to public transit
    • Focus community activity around transit stations and areas with strategic opportunities for sustainability, renewable energy, and public amenities
    • Provide a range of housing choices and affordability
    • Balance city-wide and regional goals with the community and its context
    • Ensure job space and diversity

    Timeline

    The Cambie Corridor plan includes three phases. View a summary of the project phases:

    Cambie Street corridor process chart

    Phase One

    • Phase One of the Cambie Corridor planning program delivered a set of planning principles for the Corridor, as well as an interim rezoning policy, adopted by Council on 22 January 2010.
    • The planning principles were used to plan the area along the Corridor and are consulted for future development plans.
    • The interim rezoning policy informed development applications at key sites around stations, leading up to more detailed Phase Two planning.
    • On 9 May 2011, Council approved the Cambie Corridor plan and repealed the interim rezoning policy.

    Phase Two

    • Phase Two of the Cambie Corridor planning program resulted in the approval of the Cambie Corridor plan.
    • The Cambie Corridor plan includes policies on land use, design and built form for sites along the Corridor's core areas.
    • The Cambie Corridor plan also includes a coordinated strategy for the entire Corridor which includes public benefits, an amenity strategy, a servicing strategy and a transportation plan.

    Implementation

    • Implementation - which is currently underway - includes work on a public realm strategy, a district energy strategy, a utilities servicing strategy, and a comprehensive public benefits strategy, as outlined in Phase 2.

    Phase Three

    • Timing for Phase Three is still to be determined.
    • In May 2011, Council approved Phase Three of the Cambie Corridor planning program, and requested it be integrated with other community planning exercises.
    • Phase 3 planning for areas north of 57th Avenue will begin following completion of the implementation work currently underway.
    • Phase 3 areas south of 57th Avenue - areas within Marpole - will be addressed as part of the Marpole Community Plan.
    • Construction in transit influenced areas will be informed by the Cambie Corridor terms of reference and the Phase Two plan.

    Background of the area

    The Cambie Street Corridor runs along Cambie Street from the South Fraser River in the south to North 16th Avenue and includes four Canada Line Stations.

    A transit-oriented community

    The Cambie Corridor Planning Program offers a unique opportunity to create a transit-oriented community.

    The Canada Line is connected to existing rapid transit lines and other east-west transit services, giving the corridor residents a convenient alternative to driving.

    A new look at urbanism in Vancouver

    The Cambie Street Corridor will join the downtown peninsula and the Broadway Corridor as a leading example of urbanism in Vancouver.

    Emphasizing mid-rise buildings - with taller buildings at Marine Drive and Oakridge - the plan introduces a new form of urbanism in Vancouver, transitioning away from the highrise style seen downtown.

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    Contact the Cambie Corridor planning project

    To sign up for notifications on the Cambie Street Corridor project:

    Email
    cambiecorridor@vancouver.ca

    For more information on the project, call:

    Christine Edward
    604-871-6421

    To speak in Chinese, call:

    Angela Ko
    604-871-6598

    For development enquiries on the Cambie Corridor, call:

    Rezoning Centre
    604-873-7038 

    Cambie Corridor Plan

    Cambie Corridor Plan

    Download the plan

    Last modified: Fri, 21 Jun 2013 14:59:06