Parks, recreation, and culture

Couple at dusk on False Creek Habitat Island in Vancouver

False Creek Olympic Village destination walk

Route statistics

Distance 2.9 km
Steps 3805
Elevation change 7 m

The False Creek Olympic Village walking route is 2.9 km or approximately 3,805 steps. Enjoy this world class promenade as you explore the structures, art and scenery of the 2010 Winter Olympics. The route starts beside the Athletes’ Village, travels around False Creek, past the site of the Winter Games Opening Ceremonies at BC Place, and over the Cambie Street Bridge. This circular walk travels along the pedestrian and cycle friendly Seawall. As you walk alongside False Creek, you will see Vancouver’s commitment to publicly accessible green spaces and waterways, as well as the focus on sustainable building and modern design.

Route description

The Southeast False Creek Seawall has many imaginative structures that blend well with the beauty of Vancouver. You will walk by innovative seating, sculptures, raptor perches and native garden plants, as well as the Creekside Community Centre and one of Vancouver’s most recently developed neighbourhoods; taking over the site of the 2010 Winter Olympic Athlete’s Village. Take a moment to wander around the Olympic Village structures as you walk this route. 

Accessibility

There is a staircase at the south side of the Cambie Street Bridge. There are wheelchair accessible alternate routes available if you travel under the Cambie Street Bridge and south on Spyglass place. From there you will find accessible ramps to access the pedestrian path over the bridge. 

Note The accessible route is longer, totalling 4 km, and roughly 7,920 steps. 

Route details

Follow these step by step directions so you don't miss anything along the route.

Points of interest

East False Creek

East False Creek

Science World

Formally known as the Expo Centre until 1987, the Telus World of Science is an iconic structure at the Eastern end of False Creek. “Science World is a non-profit organization which engages British Columbians in science and inspires future science and technology leadership throughout our province”. In 2010, the Telus World of Science was transformed into Sochi House, the Olympic Pavilion home to the Russian Athletes. Its grandiosity represented Russia’s enthusiasm for hosting the world during the next Olympic Winter Games in 2014. In 2010, The Telus World of Science also began to repair, expand and green the building. Extensive community consultation resulted in the creation of an outdoor science gallery and exhibition space called SWITCH: The Outdoor Science Experience.

Creekside Park

The park was developed and opened in the early 1990s. It is a popular venue for summer events and dragon boating festivals, with wonderful green space and a children’s play area.

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Stadium District

Stadium District

The Stadium District is often alive with the bustling of friendly crowds. During the Olympics, Rogers Arena, home to the Vancouver Canucks, was transformed into Canada Hockey Place, the site for the 2010 Olympic hockey tournament. Both the Vancouver 2010 Olympic Winter Games and Paralympic Games Ceremonies took place in the 60,000 seat BC Place Stadium. This was the first time that the Olympic Ceremonies were staged in the comfort of an indoor venue. BC Place has one of the largest retractable roof of its kind in the world. The BC Lions and the Vancouver Whitecaps Football Club call BC Place home

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Hinge Park

Hinge Park

Hinge Park

Immediately west of the Olympic Village is Hinge Park. It is a thoughtfully developed park with many standard features, such as benches and picnic areas. It also includes state of the art play equipment, a story circle, a big rusty bridge constructed from sewer pipe and a water pump with metal runnels at the top of a small hill. The park includes a rainwater wetland and native plants that will slowly naturalize the former industrial area.

Habitat Island

Habitat Island has been developed as an urban sanctuary. Completely surrounded by water at high tide, it is an oasis for many birds and small creatures. Replicating coastal British Columbia, the Island was developed with great attention to detail. Deep layers of soil were laid down to provide nourishment for the newly planted specimens. More than 200 native trees, shrubs, flowers, and grasses have been planted along the waterfront path and on the Island. Boulders and driftwood logs were placed to provide homes for small animals, insects, crabs, starfish, barnacles and other creatures. Habitat Island is a great source of pride for those interested in celebrating coastal biodiversity.

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Olympic Village

Olympic Village

The Olympic Village is one of the greenest communities in the world In keeping with Vancouver's Greenest City targets, the Olympic Village uses innovative energy efficiency and sustainability systems like solar heating and green roofs.

Built on the last remaining large tract of undeveloped waterfront land near downtown, the Olympic Village was created for the 2010 Winter Olympic Games. It housed athletes and Olympic officials coming from across the world. After the Olympics, the accommodation became a mixed-use community, with approximately 1,100 residential units. The area includes several parks, a large central plaza and a growing number of retail and service outlets. The development aligns with the City's goals, addressing environmental, economic, and social issues.

The Birds

Artist: Myfanwy MacLeod

Vancouver artist Myfanwy MacLeod has always been interested in the ability of public art to convey political and historical meaning. The Birds, her new work for Southeast False Creek Olympic Plaza, has been shaped by this community’s focus on sustainability. The work attempts to highlight both the lighter and graver sides of what can happen when a non-native species is introduced to an environment, how the beauty of birds can sometimes mask their threat to biodiversity.

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