Parks, recreation, and culture

Beaver Lake, Stanley Park

Beaver Lake trail destination walk

Route statistics

Distance 1.5 km
Steps 2,060
Elevation change 13 m

Beaver Lake, often described as a jewel in the centre of the park, is a much visited wetland feature unique to Stanley Park and in Vancouver. The 1.5 km, 2,060 step long walk which travels inland from Stanley Park Drive, along Beaver creek, and encircling the lake, allows visitors views of wildlife and native and introduced vegetation. 

You are guaranteed to experience a rich diversity of ecosystems in Stanley Park. As you walk along, enjoy the sights, sounds, and smells. Use all your senses to explore and discover the amazing environment that surrounds you.

A note on Stanley Park:

The beautiful area now known as Stanley Park was once home to many Indigenous peoples and remains a culturally significant area for the local First Nations people today. Stanley Park is on the unceded territories of the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh peoples. The park’s villages were occupied for thousands of years by First Nations and newcomers before their eviction in the 20th century. 

While you walk through the lush greenery, you might reflect on the many people who have entered this space for many purposes during its long history, and the many people who enjoy it today.

Unceded means that First Nations people did not give up land or legally sign it away to Britain or Canada. Vancouver and 95 percent of BC are on unceded First Nations land. In many parts of Canada, treaties were signed with First Nations that gave incoming settlers rights to much of the land, but in BC very few treaties were signed.  

Want to learn more? Read First Peoples: A Guide for Newcomers  (5.4 MB)

Route description

Get information about the Beaver Lake destination walk including details on several points of interest in our Beaver Lake Nature Walk brochure.

Learn more about the ecology of Stanley Park by stopping by the Stanley Park Nature House at Lost Lagoon. the Stanley Park Ecology Society operates the Nature House out of a former boat house. It's located on the south shore of Lost Lagoon near Alberni Street.

Curious about Indigenous plants and traditional gathering?

Accessibility

The route indicated for this nature walk all have a compacted gravel surface and is wheelchair accessible. All of Beaver Lake Trail and the trails leading to the two points of interest are virtually level, with some gradual slope on adjacent trails.

 To travel by wheelchair between the seawall and Pipeline Road, you must go via Beaver Lake due to the significant difference in elevation.

Points of interest

  • Woodland and wildlife including beavers, water fowl, Flying squirels and Great blue herons
  • Beaver Lake Bog
  • Douglas-fir grove
  • Nurse Stump
  • viewing areas with educational signage

History

Symbology

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