Parks, recreation, and culture

Ferguson Point seawall

Seawall destination walk

Route statistics

Distance 10 km
Steps 13,123
Elevation change 20 m

The 10 km or 13,123 step seawall loop around Stanley Park is Vancouver’s most popular fresh air attraction. Stanley Park is Vancouver's first park and one of the city's most beloved tourist attractions. This vast evergreen oasis, covering 400 hectares, embraces visitors and transports them to an atmosphere rich in tranquility. Since this paths completion both visitors and locals have enjoyed exercising on this world famous pathway. 

Route description

Centrally located in downtown Vancouver, Stanley Park is a must see attraction for those looking for things to do in Vancouver. A popular starting point for the Seawall walk is the east side of Stanley Park Drive by Coal Harbour. From there the circular path will take you past a full range of scenic vistas and world famous landmark, as well as monuments and sculptures that connect the past and present. A stroll around the Stanley Park Seawall is sure to be an enriching highlight of your experience in Vancouver.

Accessibility

This walk is wheelchair accessible. The pathway is a concrete surface with both mixed and separated paths for walkers, runner, and cyclists.

Note Travel on the seawall is one way, counter clockwise, around Stanley Park.

Points of interest

Rowing Club

Rowing Club

The Vancouver Rowing club has been a staple on the Coal Harbour waterfront since the early 1900’s. It is the amalgamation of the Burrard Inlet Rowing Club and the Vancouver Boating Club. The heritage building that is the clubs home was built in 1911.

Learn more about the Vancouver Rowing Club External website

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Nine O'Clock Gun

Nine O'Clock Gun

The famed Nine O'Clock Gun booms out the time daily and has done so for more than 100 years.

The gun is a naval type twelve pound muzzle-loader cast in 1816 and carries the crest of King George III and the Earl of Mulgrave, who was the Master General of Ordnance.

There are conflicting stories on the history of the gun but one thing is certain, every evening it can be heard throughout the region as it fires to mark the 9 o'clock hour.

Learn more about the Nine O'Clock Gun External website

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Brockton Point

Brockton Point

Brockton Point Lighthouse

At the east end of the park to see a Stanley Park showpiece, Brockton Point Lighthouse built in 1914.

You can walk along the shoreline pathway and under the arches supporting the lighthouse tower, or view the lighthouse from street level. The Park Board as managed the Brockton Point Lighthouse since 2006.

Totem poles

The nine totem poles at Brockton Point are BC's most visited tourist attraction.

The nine totem poles at Brockton Point are a collections that started in the 1920s at Lumberman's Arch. The Park Board bought four totems from Vancouver Island's Alert Bay, Haida Gwaii and the BC central coast Rivers Inlet, to celebrate the 1936 Golden Jubilee. In the mid 1960s, the totem poles were moved to the attractive and accessible Brockton Point.

The Skedans Mortuary Pole is a replica as the original was returned home to Haida Gwaii. In the late 1980s, the remaining totem poles were sent to various museums for preservation and the Park Board commissioned and loaned replacement totems.

The ninth and most recent totem pole, carved by Robert Yelton of the Squamish Nation, was added to Brockton Point in 2009.

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Monuments

Monuments

Harry Jerome

Artist: Jack Harman

This bronze figure commemorates athlete Harry Jerome's career as a runner. By age 18 he became the first man to hold the record in both the 100 yard and the 100 meter runs. He participated in three Olympics and was a recipient of the Order of Canada.

Girl in a Wetsuit

Artist: Elek Imredy

A life size bronze statue of a woman in a wetsuit, with flippers on her feet and her mask pushed up on her forehead, sits on a large intertidal boulder just offshore of Stanley Park. In 1968 Douglas Brown, a Vancouver lawyer, wanted to commission a sculpture inspired by the famous Copenhagen mermaid External website and approached Elek Imredy to create it. Imredy said, "I didn't believe we should have a copy of the mermaid. She is rightfully a symbol of Copenhagen... I proposed to have a life size scuba diver seated there. At that time...I didn't know of any similar sculpture anywhere in the world. It was a new idea…"

Empress of Japan figurehead

A replica of the figurehead of the SS Empress of Japan can be found on the north side of Stanley Park, west of Brockton Point. The original figurehead was on display at this location until 1960 when deterioration forced its removal. The original can now be seen on display at the Vancouver Maritime Museum. External website

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Lumbermen's Arch

Lumbermen's Arch

Erected in 1952 to honour British Columbia's lumber industry, this arch replaced the original Bowie Arch built in 1912. The original Bowie Arch was built and placed at Pender St and Hamilton for the visit of The Duke of Connaught. After years exposure to the elements and a move from downtown Vancouver the Bowie Arch was and dismantled in 1947.

View the Bowie Arch at the Vancouver Archives: Item CVA 1376-465 

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Prospect Point

Prospect Point

Prospect Point offers excellent views of the Lions Gate Bridge, North Shore Mountains and Burrard Inlet.

A two-storey signal station once stood atop Prospect Point to alert approaching vessels of strong tides, winds and maritime traffic.

Lions Gate Bridge

The Lions Gate Bridge offically opened in 1938 and connects Vancouver to the North Shore. It is named for the pair of mountain peeks that are visible while traveling north across the bridge. 

The Canadian Government designated the bridge a National Historic Site of Canada on March 24, 2005.

SS Beaver Cairn

Ship wrecked on the rocks below Prospect Point in 1888. A plaque was erected at Prospect Point to commerate the lose of the Beaver as its history is directly tied to the story of the early development of of the west coast of Canada.

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Siwash Rock

Siwash Rock

Siwash Rock is a 32 million-year-old sea stack (rock outcropping) located just off the seawall between Third Beach and Lions Gate Bridge in Stanley Park.

According to Squamish first nations legend, a man was transformed into Siwash Rock "as an indestructible monument to Clean Fatherhood" – a reward for unselfishness.

A lookout above Siwash Rock is accessible from Park Drive or Siwash Rock Trail leading from Prospect Point and Third Beach.

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The Beaches

The Beaches

Second Beach

Second Beach in Stanley Park is located at the junction of Stanley Park Drive and North Lagoon Drive next to Second Beach Pool. an oceanside, heated, outdoor pool. Barbeques can be used at nearby Ceperley Meadow and a picnic shelter can be reserved for private gatherings.

Third Beach

Located at Ferguson Point in Stanley Park, Third Beach is a naturally sandy beach surrounded by trees that shield dippers and tanners from urban noise. This is a great beach for quiet bathing, picnics, and watching sunsets.

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