Parks, recreation, and culture

Musqueam Park

Musqueam Park destination walk

Route statistics

Distance 5 km
Steps 6,561
Elevation change 20 m

The Musqueam Park Walk is an out and back loop. One of the longer Destination Walks, a complete circuit totals 5 km, or approximately 6,561 steps. It offers a diverse array of scenery and has both rich history and modern day social and cultural significance. This is a wonderful route for those looking to experience an environment that has retained original characteristics, as well as undergone great change. Take a walk along this fantastic route and explore a truly unique and significant urban wilderness.

Route description

The Musqueam Park walking route travels through the Dunbar-Southlands neighbourhood in the south west corner of Vancouver. The area is a quiet rural region within a major metropolis, and may be unique in the world. The wooded area has a rustic and remote feeling, and is somewhat isolated from the rest of the City. This walk offers a peaceful escape away from the hustle and bustle of typical urban living.

Accessibility

This walk is made up of dirt, gravel and concrete paths as well as roadways. These paths are used by equestrians, and can often quite muddy in areas. Come prepared with appropriate footwear, especially after or during rainy weather. On many days the Bridal Path is not suitable for wheelchairs.

Route details

Follow these step by step directions so you don't miss anything along the route.

Points of interest

Deering Island Park

Deering Island Park

Located on a small island in the Fraser River, Deering Island Park is a semi-natural area perfect for enjoying the peaceful views of the river and tidal marshes. In late summer, the park is filled with dragonflies and the sweet scent (and flavour!) of blackberries.

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Musqueam lands

Musqueam lands

A large section of the walking route borders Musqueam First Nations. This area is 168 hectares in size and home to the majority of the people living in Southlands. It is the home of Vancouver’s oldest-known residents and is the only reserve to lie within the boundaries of the City of Vancouver.

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Musqueam-Cutthroat Creek

Musqueam-Cutthroat Creek

Musqueam-Cutthroat Creek system which has its headwaters in Pacific Spirit Regional Park and flows through the area into the Fraser River delta.  The two kilometre stream has enormous significance and supports spawning runs of wild Coho and Chum Salmon as well as Cutthroat Trout.  The creek also provides the Musqueam First Nations people with plants that are harvested for traditional uses.

In 1997, a devastating contamination occurred when household pollutants were released from nearby homes. The Musqueam Ecological Conservation Society and the David Suzuki Foundation sprang into action to rescue the fish, and relocate them to nearby Cutthroat Creek. The restoration efforts have proven to enhance the population of insects which the fish feed on, and encourage spawning in the area.

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Musqueam Park

Musqueam Park

Southlands

Defined by the area’s geography, and zoning. Southlands is unlike any other community in Vancouver. It has been granted a special semi-agricultural zoning status which allows residents to keep livestock within 20 minutes from the core of a modern, world-class city. The walking route travels along a path that has been created with equestrian use as a top priority.

Musqueam Park

Musqueam Park is a large 22.05 hectare area. Most of this area is dominated by forest, with the main trail following the perimeter of the park. Ferns, and thimbleberries line the walkway and bigleaf maple, sycamore, red alder, hemlock and cedar trees reach skyward.

Crown Street

In 2006, Crown Street became Vancouver’s first example of a sustainable streetscape. Lined by structural grass and planted swales, the narrow street meanders downhill following a natural drainage course. This innovative construction model allows storm water to be absorbed into the land, rather than creating an intense demand on the existing storm water system. Pollutants are filtered naturally, and nutrients reabsorbed. Further ecological benefits include stabilizing the base flow of the nearby creeks. The roadway also serves to slow and calm traffic, as well as improve aesthetics.

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