Aerial view of Yaletown and False Creek looking west towards Kitsilano, West Point Grey, and UBC

Rezoning

Rezoning changes how a property can be used or developed. The purpose of rezoning is to:

  • Change land use regulations to allow development that aligns with City Council's priorities
  • Secure development contributions to help provide new or upgraded public facilities so our growing city is liveable for all

Property owners can apply to rezone sites according to Council-approved rezoning policies. We, the City of Vancouver, can also rezone sites, usually on an area-wide basis. City Council decides on all rezoning applications.

Find a rezoning application

The map legend and layers are in the map menu on mobile devices. The layers sort applications by status, then by housing type. Show or hide layers using the checkbox next to each layer.

Find an application by address

How rezoning works

Rezoning involves an application, staff review, public input, and City Council decision. Find out how your feedback informs the process.

Apply for rezoning

Steps to get advice and apply to rezone your property.

Find out what can go on your site

Refer to the Zoning and Development By-law to identify what uses are allowed on a site, including the size and location of any structures.

Types of rezoning

The Marine Gateway mixed-use development was allowed due to a Comprehensive Development District rezoning

Site-specific zones

Comprehensive Development (CD-1) District rezonings create new zoning districts to allow for certain uses and forms of development on specific sites. There may be certain conditions that the developer has to meet (such as legal agreements or design guidance), before City Council enacts the new zoning by-law.

Illustration of townhouses

Plan changes

Plan amendment rezonings change an area's zoning from one district to another (for example, from RS-1 to RM-8A). This type of rezoning isn't site-specific and eligible sites are typically outlined in community or area plans. They may have fewer legal agreements and instead have design guidelines specific to the zoning district schedule.

The infill housing at 1523 Davie Street is built under a text amendment rezoning for minor changes in the form of development permitted on site.

Text changes

Text amendment rezonings change what's allowed within existing zoning areas, including official development plans and CD-1 zones. These can range from minor changes to what is currently permitted (such as adding a land use or correcting an error) to major changes (such as a complete redevelopment and rewriting of an existing CD-1 zone).

Related projects

Development process redesign

Development process redesign is a comprehensive review of our development process functions involving multiple City departments.

Contact the Rezoning Centre

rezoning@vancouver.ca