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Rendering of future NEFC park design

Park design in Northeast False Creek

The Vancouver Park Board, City of Vancouver, and landowner Concord Pacific are working together to create the Northeast False Creek Park, a space that is authentically Vancouver and that reflects our city’s rich heritage.

It’s a big plan that will revitalize Andy Livingstone Park, and expand and renew Creekside Park. It will also improve habitat for urban wildlife and the shoreline in False Creek. It will be a place to play, replenish, picnic, splash, and connect with others.

What's happening

What do you think of the updated park design guiding principles?

We enhanced our park design guiding principles, building on what we heard during our previous public consultations. We're also receiving input and confirming the principles with the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations, and park stakeholders.

Give your feedback on the updated guiding principles in our survey.

The survey closes on August 8. Your responses will help us refine the principles further, to guide the direction of the revised concept design.

Take the survey  請參與問卷調查

Confirming the updated park design principles this summer will help us guide the revised park design. In fall 2018, we’ll hold a design workshop with all park stakeholders about our design explorations that reflect the design principles.

What we heard in Stage 3

Recap of Stage 2

We received a lot of interest in the draft concept plan released in June 2017. We have engaged with a wide group of stakeholders, including over 5,000 people so far. Here are the highlights of what we heard in Stage 2:

  • Bigger waterfront park
  • Design to be bolder, more unique and authentic design rooted in Vancouver
  • Meaningfully engage with the local First Nations
  • Support for nature, wildlife and habitat
  • Support and concerns for large events in the park
  • Recognize rich cultural heritage of the area
  • Define the big moves and be aware of fragmented spaces

Drawing on this feedback, we extended our listening phase to take the time to engage deeper with the the local First Nations and park stakeholders.

Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh Nations

We’ve been working closely with the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh Nations to understand Indigenous values and principles. Our goal is to reflect what we have heard from the local nations in the revised park design. Through this work, we’ve learned from the nations that Northeast False Creek Park is an opportunity to:

  • Make the cultures of three nations visible
  • Orient the park to the waterfront in a way that reflects the connection the First Nations have with the land and water
  • Create a welcoming place to gather, heal, and learn from Indigenous people
  • Include harvestable plants

Read our Indigenous Engagement Report for more about these themes PDF file (4 MB)

Chinatown community

We’ve also heard from the Chinatown community. The key interests for the park that emerged as part of our early 2018 Chinatown event are as follows:

  • Strengthen the park’s connection to Chinatown
  • Enhance the park’s cultural context
  • Support the cultural life of Chinatown

Read the January 2018 Chinatown workshop summary report:

Event producers, residents, and sports-field users

On the one hand, we’ve heard from event producers that Northeast False Creek Park represents the last opportunity to host large events in Downtown. On the other hand, residents are concerned that frequently hosting events would limit their daily use of the park.

Lastly, the sports fields users wish that the renewed park maintain the service levels and see opportunities for sport hosting, tying in with the new Events and Entertainment District.

A welcoming and unique park

The City of Vancouver and the Park Board are committed to strengthening their relationships with local First Nations and Urban Indigenous people. Northeast False Creek Park is located within the traditional territories of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh Nations. It’s also next to Downtown and near significant Urban Indigenous communities. We see the waterfront park as a unique opportunity to physically express reconciliation.

The park is intended to be a welcoming and inclusive space. The revised park design will be a contemporary park, inspired by the way the three Nations relate to the land and water, and reflect values we can all relate to: sustainability, community, and wellness.

How did we get here?

By City of Vancouver

The Indigenous Engagement Working Group guided our extended listening phase with the three nations and was led by the Park Board reconciliation planner. Our key takeaway from this stage was to become aware of and to deconstruct our inherited colonial thinking. This shift in perspective allowed space for local First Nations values to find expression, and to create a unique, world-class waterfront park that is rooted in a sense of place.

  • How did we get here?

    By City of Vancouver

    The Indigenous Engagement Working Group guided our extended listening phase with the three nations and was led by the Park Board reconciliation planner. Our key takeaway from this stage was to become aware of and to deconstruct our inherited colonial thinking. This shift in perspective allowed space for local First Nations values to find expression, and to create a unique, world-class waterfront park that is rooted in a sense of place.

  • Replenish park identity statement

    By City of Vancouver

    This goal of this statement (200 KB, PDF) is to ground the new vision of the park design in Indigenous values and principles. It reflects what we learned and anchors the design in a philosophy centered on connecting to the land and water. This foundation welcomes all cultural communities of Vancouver and envisions the park as a place where people can replenish.

  • Key themes we’ve heard from Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh

    By City of Vancouver

    The following themes emerged as part of our extended engagement: (1) Visibility of Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh; (2) Oriented to the waterfront; (3) A welcoming space; (4) A place to gather, heal, and learn from local First Nations (5) Indigenous approach to planting.

  • How did we engage with the Chinatown community?

    By City of Vancouver

    We’ve also engaged with a large group of people from Chinatown in January 2018. Over 100 people attended the workshop on the NEFC Area Plan to provide input.

  • Key themes we’ve heard from the Chinatown community

    By City of Vancouver

    We’ve gathered input on a variety of aspects: (1) Connectivity and accessibility; park design; (2) Architecture, design and heritage; (3) Design for all ages; and (4) Community and people. The key themes for the park design are: (1) Connect to the waterfront, (2) Compliment the surrounding cultural buildings and spaces, and (3) host traditional cultural activities in the park.

  • Paradigm shift

    By City of Vancouver

    We realized we had to seize the opportunity to design a remarkable and unique waterfront park, authentically Vancouver, reflective of this point in time, in the heart of Downtown. In the next stage, we will present a revised concept design, reflecting the new vision for the park, rooted in the local First Nations cultures, and welcoming for all Vancouverites.

  • Enriched park design principles

    By City of Vancouver

    The extended engagement showed us Indigenous values and principles that built on and enhanced those we’d already heard in our public engagement. We have woven in what we learned while preserving the engagement done to date with the park stakeholders. Through this reconciliation journey, we have realized that committing to reconciliation benefits all of us.

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Project timeline

Here is our process and anticipated milestones.

  • Fall 2016 - winter 2017

    Stage 1: Analysis and Early Directions

  • Winter - spring 2017

    Stage 2: Draft concept plan

  • Summer 2017 - summer 2018

    Stage 3: Extended engagement

     

  • We are here
  • Summer 2018 - winter 2019

    Stage 4: Revised concept plan

  • Spring 2019

    Park Board decision

Guiding principles

We’ve added and refined the park design guiding principles defined in the earlier stage of the project. They now reflect what we’ve heard as part of our extended engagement with the three nations, and park stakeholders, including Urban Indigenous people and the Chinatown community.

Identity

Community

Nature

Destination